EDWARD NUREMOH

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 2016

Edward Nuremoh


Panel from August 18, 1939

Appeared from July 5,1939 to August 26, 1939

Anagram Name: NUREMOH is “home run” spelled backward.

Edward Nuremoh was a former N.Y. Blue Sox baseball player, heir to the Nuremoh fortune, former husband of Tess Trueheart and a murderer. He was a handsome, fair-haired, fifty-year old man with a small blond mustache. Edward’s father, a multi-millionaire, had “owned a chain of sporting goods stores, the biggest outfit of its kind in the world”. Chester Gould had Albert G. Spaulding in mind when he described Edward’s father. Spaulding was a baseball pitcher, manager, club president and founder of the sporting goods manufacturing company that was named after him.

Edward Nuremoh lived at the Nuremoh mansion with his mother, Mrs. Nuremoh, his imbecilic cousin, Karl, and his Aunt Margot, a bedridden old lady who controlled the Nuremoh fortune. Margot had specified that Edward had to be married before she died or he wouldn’t get one cent of her fortune. Edward Nuremoh courted Tess TRueheart and asked her to marry him. Tess fell in love with Edward an accepted his proposal.

All the while, Edward Nuremoh was really in love with Lola Lavir, whom Margot has rejected as on unsuitable candidate to be his wife. On the eve of Edward and Tess’s marriage, Peter Vaness Baskin, Aunt Margot’s long-lost, favorite nephew, arrived at the mansion unexpectedly. He announced that he was home to stay. Edward and Mrs. Nuremoh were worried that Aunt Margo would now change her will. Edward and Tess were married in Aunt Margot’s bedroom with all of the family present. After the ceremony, Peter Vaness Basken discovered that Margot was dead and had been dead for hours.

Peter determined that Margot’s death wasn’t due to a heart attack and so he called the police. Tracy took the case and determined that Margot had been shot through the heart at close range as she lay in bed. Edward accused Karl and the police found the murder gun in Karl’s room, but Tess found a burn hole in Edwards’s jacket pocket and mercury from Margot’s broken thermometer in his shoe. Confronted by Tess, Edward Nuremoh admitted he had murdered Margot for the money before she could change her will.

Horrified, Tess ran from the house to the lake cliff for some air. Edward, now determined to kill Tess and make it look like an accident, raced after her, threw stones at her and tripped her into a small stream. Tess eluded Edward for awhile, but fell exhausted in the trail that Edward was using to return to the house. Edward spotted Tess, drew his gun, aimed and fired.

Just at that moment, Lola, who had heard about Aunt Margot’s murder, had come to the lake cliff looking for Edward and stepped into his line of fire. Lola fell dead, killed by the bullet Edward had intended for Tess. Recoiling in horror at having killed the woman he really loved, Edward told Tess “you can never forgive me – but you can forget me!” Edward Nuremoh picked up Lola in his arms and walked off the cliff, plunging to his death one hundred and thirty feet below. Tracy found Tess, who was hysterical, and with the aid of the police, recovered Edward Nuremoh and Lola Lavir’s bodies from the base of the cliff.


Adapted and reprinted with permission from the author Victor E. Wichert, “The Dick Tracy Encyclopedia, Oct. 4, 1931 – Dec. 25, 1977”. Dick Tracy is a registered trademark of Tribune Media Services, Inc.

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“Yes, criminals do make their marks in the world, usually ten little fingerprint patterns on an FBI file card.”
- Chester Gould
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